• How many species:
    • There were 4 subspecies, now there are 3:
      • South-central (Diceros bicornis minor) most common, live in southern  Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, northern and eastern South Africa
      • South-western (Diceros bicornis bicornis) from the savannas of Namibia, Angola, Botswana and western South Africa;
      • East African (Diceros bicornis michaeli), mainly in Tanzania; and
      • West African (Diceros bicornis longipes) declared extinct in 2011.
  • Numbers:
    • Near the end of the 20th century, numbers were severely reduced from an estimated 70 000 in the late 1960s to only 2 410 in 1995.
  • Status:
    • Critically endangered
  • Size:
    • Adults stand at 1.50–1.75 m high at the shoulder and are 3.5–3.9 m in length.
    • An adult can weigh between 850 to 1 600 kg, sometimes even to 1 800 kg.
    • Females are smaller than the males.
  • Age:
    • Black rhino can live up to 40 – 50 years in the wild
  • Horns:
    • Two horns on the skull are made of keratin
    • Larger front horn typically 50 cm long, sometimes even up to 140 cm.
    • A third smaller horn can sometimes develop.
  • Other features:
    • The black rhino is much smaller than the white rhino
    • Has a hooked lip
    • Eats leaves and twigs
  • Bet you didn’t know this:
    • Black rhino are active both day and night, but are least active during the hottest parts of the day where they seek shade.
    • Pregnancy last about 15 months and they only have 1 calf.
    • Young rhinos can walk 10 minutes after they are born.  However, the mother will keep it hidden for a couple of weeks in fear that it may get trampled.
    • Black rhino calves walk behind their mothers.